bias How bias has made vast numbers of studies in social psychology unreliable

Can we ever study ourselves without our expectations affecting our conclusions? A damning report suggests that bias on the part of researchers has made vast numbers of studies in social psychology unreliable. Social psychology is the study of how human behaviour is affected by other people, and it seems to be particularly vulnerable to unreliable findings and conflicting explanations….

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my weekly column.  Image: Scott

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

test tubes Doctors and police struggle with false positive test resultsLast month, the drinking water in a Colorado town was declared unsafe, because it had been contaminated by an ingredient from cannabis. It took two days to discover that this was not the case – a water test had turned up a false positive result. In fact, false positives are widespread in our everyday lives, and we seem to have an innate inability to get to grips with them…

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my weekly column.  Image: Petr Kratochvil

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

print 590 The legal maze holding back data science

Read the rest of this article at Nature.

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
Tagged with:
 

pandoras box The Pandora Effect: Why curiosity beats common sense

Curiosity is often a positive thing: it is at the heart of scientific progress, for example. But it also has a negative side.

“Rubbernecking” – gawping at car crashes when we drive past – is one such example. A government-sponsored study of accidents on the M6 motorway attributed 29 per cent of them during the study period to drivers rubbernecking in the opposite carriageway. The issue was eventually tackled by the UK Highways Agency,  who reduced accidents by erecting giant screens at crash sites.

The problem is we just can’t help ourselves. In a recent study, researchers have found that we’re still curious even if we know the outcome will be negative.

Christopher Hsee of the University of Chicago and colleagues dubbed the tendency to opt for an uncertain outcome even when we know it might have unpleasant consequences,  the Pandora Effect.

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my weekly column.  Image: Marcelo

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

pinnochio Researchers are discovering new ways of detecting liesCan you tell if someone is lying? Our ability to spot a lie is only just better than guessing with the flip of a coin. But, surprisingly, it’s easier to tell whether a person is fibbing if they are wearing a veil, suggests a fresh study.

The experiment was devised by researchers at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology in Canada, and the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. They filmed two videos of a woman watching a stranger’s bag, one of which showed the woman stealing items from it. They then played one or the other video separately to female volunteers designated as “witnesses…

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my weekly column.  Image: Chris Short

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:


Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...