6281020696 ce367894db z How being overpaid could destroy your passion for doing what you loveExecutive pay has risen astronomically over recent years: America’s top CEOs currently earn ten times what they did 30 years ago, according to a 2015 brief by the Economic Policy Institute, and around 300 times more than the average worker. And if that fact on its own isn’t enough to make you feel frustrated, consider this one: The people who take home the biggest paychecks aren’t necessarily the best at what they do….

Read the rest of this article at NY Mag

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

27071918831 4f0a75fcca z Why over 80% of parents of overweight kids fail to realise their children are overweight

Overweight? You probably haven’t noticed. Repeated studies have shown that overweight and obese people often don’t consider themselves to be so….

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: David

 

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

2242690522 731246d4b7 z Why do we get hangry?

Ever felt hungry and angry at the same time? There’s evidence that “hanger” is a real phenomenon, one that can affect your work and relationships….

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: Juha-Matti Herrala

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

bbc2 How Technology Based on Swarms of Bees Can Help Predict The Future

A tool inspired by swarming insects is helping people predict the future – making groups of people smarter than their members are by themselves.

Read the rest of this article at BBC Future.

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

5041329333 bed88bde7a o Fake news shapes our opinions even when we know it’s not true

Fake it till you make it. That old adage has never been so poignant in a year that has seen a surge in fake news. The rise in stories describing events that never happened, often involving fake people in fake places, has led Facebook and Google promising to tackle them. But are we really so gullible?

According to several studies, the answer is yes: even the most obvious fake news starts to become believable if it’s shared enough times…

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

Follow Neurobonkers on TwitterFacebookGoogle+RSS, or join the mailing list.
 

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:


Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...