2242690522 731246d4b7 z Why do we get hangry?

Ever felt hungry and angry at the same time? There’s evidence that “hanger” is a real phenomenon, one that can affect your work and relationships….

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: Juha-Matti Herrala

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bbc2 How Technology Based on Swarms of Bees Can Help Predict The Future

A tool inspired by swarming insects is helping people predict the future – making groups of people smarter than their members are by themselves.

Read the rest of this article at BBC Future.

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5041329333 bed88bde7a o Fake news shapes our opinions even when we know it’s not true

Fake it till you make it. That old adage has never been so poignant in a year that has seen a surge in fake news. The rise in stories describing events that never happened, often involving fake people in fake places, has led Facebook and Google promising to tackle them. But are we really so gullible?

According to several studies, the answer is yes: even the most obvious fake news starts to become believable if it’s shared enough times…

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

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cover What attracts people to modern art?The world of modern art is often viewed as irrational and perplexing by outsiders and insiders alike. Last fall, for example….

Read the rest of this article at NY Mag Image Credit: MOMA

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brain tinglews The Mystery of the Disappearing Brain TinglesIsy Suttie has felt “head squeezing” since she was young. The comedian, best known for playing Dobbie in the British sitcom Peep Show, is one of many people who experience autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) – a tingly feeling often elicited by certain videos or particular mundane interactions. Growing up, Suttie says she had always assumed everyone felt it too….

Read the rest of this article at New Scientist – the home of Brain Scanner, my monthly column.  Image: Dierk Schaefer

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